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Q19 - Smoke Inhalation

Question:  A ventilation system for metal grinding operations catches fire and smoke pushes back into the facility and an employee is exposed to heavy smoke before exiting the building. At the muster point, the employee reports lung irritation, a headache, and begins to vomit. At a clinic, a doctor administers an anti-inflammatory shot to the employee to relieve lung inflammation and irritation. Further, the doctor prescribes over the counter ibuprofen per directions and requires the employee take the rest of his shift off to rest at home. The employee is to return to work the next day. Is it recordable?

Answer: YES. The anti-inflammatory shot is considered “medical treatment beyond first aid” as it is prescribed medication and is not an over the counter anti-inflammatory product.  The injury should be marked as a respiratory condition on the OSHA 300 Log.  1904.7(a) You must consider an injury or illness to meet the general recording criteria, and therefore to be recordable, if it results in any of the following: death, days away from work, restricted work or transfer to another job, medical treatment beyond first aid, or loss of consciousness. You must also consider a case to meet the general recording criteria if it involves a significant injury or illness diagnosed by a physician or other licensed health care professional, even if it does not result in death, days away from work, restricted work or job transfer, medical treatment beyond first aid, or loss of consciousness. 1904.7(b)(5)(ii)(A) Using a non-prescription medication at nonprescription strength (for medications available in both prescription and non-prescription form, a recommendation by a physician or other licensed health care professional to use a non-prescription medication at prescription strength is considered medical treatment for recordkeeping purposes);


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