is it recordable? ask here: 
Did the Incident Occur in the Work Environment? (Anywhere the employee was as a condition of employment?)
Did the Employee Receive Medical Treatment Beyond First Aid, Work Restrictions or Time Off Work?

4 Basic Steps to Determine OSHA Recordability:

1. Establish whether or not they are an employee for recordkeeping purposes and not a contractor, although, if you supervise a contractor’s daily activities then they are considered employees for recordkeeping purposes.

 

2. Establish work-relatedness. OSHA operates under a presumption of work-relatedness. In order to overcome that presumption you must have evidence. It is wrong to assume it’s not work related because there isn’t evidence that it is. There is a short list of exceptions (the commute is one exception).

 

3. Establish severity. If it requires medical treatment beyond first aid, restricted work, lost time, loss of consciousness, broken bones, hearing loss or death, those are all considered severe enough to record.

 

4. Ensure it is a new case, not a continuance of an injury that has already been counted. Of course, there are many more details regarding recordkeeping that won’t fit in a LinkedIn post but this should get you started.

 

If you’d like us to answer your recordkeeping question, simply submit it in the form above or review the questions we have already answered here.

If you need help filling out OSHA form, check out the guide/tutorial on OSHA's website here.

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