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    Blog Posts (140)
    • Q124 - Turkey in an Autoclave

      Question: Lab workers conducting animal research on livestock decide to cook a turkey in an autoclave while celebrating a birthday of a coworker. Several months later 2 of the employees are diagnosed with prion disease. The employees are prescribed medications. Is it recordable? Answer: YES. Although it is likely that the employees violated company procedures and are, in a sense, at fault for this outcome, OSHA operates on a no-fault basis. There is no exception based on who is at fault (unless the employee intentionally caused self-harm) and therefore it should be presumed work-related and recorded. 1904.5(a): Basic requirement. You must consider an injury or illness to be work-related if an event or exposure in the work environment either caused or contributed to the resulting condition or significantly aggravated a pre-existing injury or illness. Work-relatedness is presumed for injuries and illnesses resulting from events or exposures occurring in the work environment, unless an exception in §1904.5(b)(2) specifically applies ​ ​ #RedBeard #osha #osharecordkeeping #safety #occupationalsafety #recordkeeping #injuries #HR #injury #autoclave #turkey #madcowdisease #prion #labsafety

    • Q122 - Mysterious Allergic Reaction

      Question: An employee working as a janitor in a laboratory facility suddenly falls ill. His doctor believes it is an allergic reaction to something in the work environment. There are no known exposures despite air sampling and a thorough investigation. Is it recordable? Answer: YES. Even though it is not clear what caused the reaction, due to OSHA's presumption of work-relatedness, the injury must be presumed to be caused by work because it happened in the work environment. Further, the doctor's opinion is that it was caused by the work environment. It is also possible that the employee became sensitized to a chemical at work, such as a cleaning agent, that has not affected the employee previously. ​ 1904.5(a): Basic requirement. You must consider an injury or illness to be work-related if an event or exposure in the work environment either caused or contributed to the resulting condition or significantly aggravated a pre-existing injury or illness. Work-relatedness is presumed for injuries and illnesses resulting from events or exposures occurring in the work environment, unless an exception in §1904.5(b)(2) specifically applies ​ ​ #RedBeard #osha #osharecordkeeping #safety #occupationalsafety #recordkeeping #injuries #HR #injury #mysterious #allergicreaction

    • Q121 - Under the Influence

      Question: In a sad attempt to promote safety at work, an employee dresses in a costume and begins recording promotional videos without explicit approval from management. The employee falls down a flight of stairs and breaks multiple bones. The same employee also is found to be under the influence of THC after failing a drug test. Is it recordable? Answer: YES. Being under the influence or using poor judgment are not exceptions to the OSHA recordkeeping guidelines. A significant incident that is beyond the employer's control must still be recorded. ​ Letter of Interpretation: In the final rule, OSHA notes that many circumstances that lead to a recordable work-related injury or illness are "beyond the employer's control." Nevertheless, because such an injury or illness was caused, contributed to, or significantly aggravated by an event or exposure at work, it must be recorded on the OSHA form (assuming that it meets one or more of the recording criteria and does not qualify for an exception to the geographic presumption). This approach is consistent with the no-fault recordkeeping system OSHA has historically adopted, which includes work-related injuries and illnesses, regardless of the level of employer control or non-control involved. The concept of fault has never been a consideration in any recordkeeping system of the U.S. Department of Labor. Both the Note to Subpart A of the final rule and the new OSHA Form 300 expressly state that recording a case does not indicate fault, negligence, or compensability. In addition, OSHA recognizes that injury and illness rates do not necessarily indicate a lack of interest in safety and health or success or failure per se. OSHA feels it is to the benefit of all parties to go beyond the numbers and look at an employer's safety and health program. ​ ​ #RedBeard #osha #osharecordkeeping #safety #occupationalsafety #recordkeeping #injuries #HR #injury #THC #marijuana

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    • Q122 - Mysterious Allergic Reaction

      Please support our partners who make it possible for this site to continue operating free for you! Q122 - Mysterious Allergic Reaction Question: An employee working as a janitor in a laboratory facility suddenly falls ill. His doctor believes it is an allergic reaction to something in the work environment. There are no known exposures despite air sampling and a thorough investigation. Is it recordable? Answer: YES. Even though it is not clear what caused the reaction, due to OSHA's presumption of work-relatedness, the injury must be presumed to be caused by work because it happened in the work environment. Further, the doctor's opinion is that it was caused by the work environment. It is also possible that the employee became sensitized to a chemical at work, such as a cleaning agent, that has not affected the employee previously. ​ 1904.5(a) : Basic requirement. You must consider an injury or illness to be work-related if an event or exposure in the work environment either caused or contributed to the resulting condition or significantly aggravated a pre-existing injury or illness. Work-relatedness is presumed for injuries and illnesses resulting from events or exposures occurring in the work environment, unless an exception in §1904.5(b)(2) specifically applies ​ ​ ​ ​ Ask a Question

    • Q123 - Stop the Count!

      Please support our partners who make it possible for this site to continue operating free for you! Tell them RedBeard sent you! Q123 - Stop the Count! Question: A groundskeeper who takes great pride in his work confronts a man wearing a costume of a Sesame Street character, the Count. The man was hired to attend a birthday party of a child. After the party he had been drinking and, according to the groundskeeper stole a golf cart and was driving through the garden, damaging the grass and various flowers and bushes all while yelling out his count of how many plants he destroyed. While attempting to stop the Count, the groundskeeper badly sprained his ankle and was provided prescription strength ibuprofen by his doctor. The costumed man was eventually arrested by police on three counts of reckless behavior, public intoxication and trespassing. Is it recordable? Answer: YES. The employee was injured in the work-environment and there is no exception listed for injuries caused by Sesame Street characters. ​ 1904.5(a) : Basic requirement. You must consider an injury or illness to be work-related if an event or exposure in the work environment either caused or contributed to the resulting condition or significantly aggravated a pre-existing injury or illness. Work-relatedness is presumed for injuries and illnesses resulting from events or exposures occurring in the work environment, unless an exception in §1904.5(b)(2) specifically applies ​ ​ ​ ​ Ask a Question

    • OSHARecordkeepingScenarios

      My Items OSHA Recordkeeping Scenarios Turkey in an Autoclave Question: Lab workers conducting animal research on livestock decide to cook a turkey in an autoclave while celebrating a birthday of a coworker. Several months later 2 of the employees are diagnosed with prion disease. The employees are prescribed medications. Is it recordable? More Stop the Count! Question: A groundskeeper who takes great pride in his work confronts a man wearing a costume of a Sesame Street character, the Count. The man was hired to attend a birthday party of a child. After the party he had been drinking and, according to the groundskeeper stole a golf cart and was driving through the garden, damaging the grass and various flowers and bushes all while yelling out his count of how many plants he destroyed. While attempting to stop the Count, the groundskeeper badly sprained his ankle and was provided prescription strength ibuprofen by his doctor. The costumed man was eventually arrested by police on three counts of reckless behavior, public intoxication and trespassing. Is it recordable? More Mysterious Allergic Reaction Question: An employee working as a janitor in a laboratory facility suddenly falls ill. His doctor believes it is an allergic reaction to something in the work environment. There are no known exposures despite air sampling and a thorough investigation. Is it recordable? More Under the Influence Question: In a sad attempt to promote safety at work, an employee dresses in a costume and begins recording promotional videos without explicit approval from management. The employee falls down a flight of stairs and breaks multiple bones. The same employee also is found to be under the influence of THC after failing a drug test. Is it recordable? More Helping a Non-Employee Question: An employee sees a beverage vendor vehicle stuck in the snow and ice in the company parking lot and goes out to help. While pushing the vehicle, the employee strains their back. A doctor prescribes muscle relaxers and physical therapy to the employee. Is it recordable? More Responding to After-Hours Emergency Question: A safety manager receives a call at 1:30a regarding a serious injury that occurred to an employee during the night shift. The safety manager is required by his job responsibilities to drive to the hospital from his home to begin an investigation. On the way to the hospital, the groggy safety manager's company cell phone rings and as he reaches over to grab his cell phone he veers off of the road and rolls his vehicle into a ditch. He breaks some ribs and needs stitches as a result of the accident. Is it recordable? More Monkey Bite Question: A macaque monkey bites an employee working in a research lab. Monkeys can be naturally infected with Cercopithecine Herpes Virus 1, also known as "B virus." At a physician's discretion an anti-viral treatment is initiated as a prophylactic treatment prior to determining whether or not the animal was a carrier. The monkey is later examined to reveal that the monkey does not test positive for B virus. Is it recordable? More Fingers Slammed in Car Door Question: An employee pulls into the company parking lot at the start of the day. They exit their vehicle and lean against the truck door frame as they put on their work boots. A wind gust slams the truck's door on their hand and breaks two bones. Is it recordable? More COVID-19 Vaccine Injury Question: An employee receives the COVID-19 vaccine as required by their employer. Due to a negative reaction to the vaccine, they become partially paralyzed and can no longer work. Is it recordable? More Company New Year Party Question: An employee participates in an optional office New Year party that was put on by the company during one afternoon of a regular workday. A spill creates a slippery floor and the employee slips and breaks her arm. Is it recordable? More Domestic Terrorism: Explosion Question: An explosion does widespread damage to an entire city block. Early reports indicate the explosion was caused by an RV that was parked on the street. One employee, who was working at his desk nearby and was injured by the explosion requires surgery to remove shrapnel from his shoulder. Is it recordable? More Injured at Customer's Home Question: A North Pole Inc. employee begins work delivering presents. He takes a break from delivering presents to eat some milk and cookies. During his break he trips over a toy car that fell from his toy sack, striking his head against a large piece of coal which required 8 stitches. North Pole Inc., a company registered in Delaware, has clearly-written procedures about proper toy sack handling that the employee failed to follow. Furthermore, due to COVID-19 eating food samples is strictly prohibited. Is it recordable? More

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    • Have you ever had a safety question? Ask a safety pro!

      isitrecordable.com is on a mission to provide safety information to support professionals responsible for safety. I added this forum as a place where professionals can support one another. Post your questions and respectfully respond to questions posted by your peers. The only rule is to be polite! Thanks for supporting isitrecordable.com. Be sure to check out our sponsors on the homepage and give them some of your business! By supporting them you are helping keep this site operating smoothly. Tell them RedBeard sent you! -RedBeard

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